Ascapart

A giant conquered by Sir Bevis of Southampton. He was thirty feet high, and the space between his eyes was twelve inches. This mighty giant, whose effigy figures on the city gates of Southampton, could carry under his arm without feeling distressed Sir Bevis with his wife and horse. (See Giants.)

“As Bevis of Southampton fell upon Ascapart.” Shakespeare: 2 Henry VI., act ii. 3.

Ascendant In casting a horoscope the easternmost star, representing the house of life, is called the ascendant, because it is in the act of ascending. This is a man's strongest star, and so long as it is above the horizon his fortune is said to be in the ascendant. When a man's circumstances begin to improve, and things look brighter, we say his star is in the ascendant. (See Houses, Stars.)

House of the Ascendant
includes five degrees of the zodiac above the point just rising, and twenty-five below it. Usually, the point of birth is referred to.

The lord of the Ascendant
is any planet within the “house of the Ascendant.” The house and lord of the Ascendant at birth were said by astrologers to exercises great influence on the future life of the child. Perhaps Deborah referred to the influence of the stars when she said “the stars in their courses fought against Sisera.”

(Judges v. 20.)

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Related Content