Delight

is “to make light.” Hence Shakespeare speaks of the disembodied soul as “the delighted spirit ... blown with restless violence round about the pendant world” (Measure for Measure, iii. 1). So again he says of gifts, “the more delayed; delighted” (Cymbeline, v. 5), meaning the longer they are delayed the “lighter” or less valuable they are esteemed. Delighted, in the sense of “pleased,” means light-hearted, with buoyant spirits.

The delight of mankind.
So Titus, the Roman emperor, was entitled (40, 79-81).

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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