Denarius

A Roman silver coin, equal in value to ten ases (deni-ases ). The word was used in France and England for the inferior coins, whether silver or copper, and for ready money generally. Now d ( denarius) stands for money less than a shilling, as £ s. d.

“The denarius ... shown to our Lord ... was the tribute-money payable by the Jews to the Roman emperor, and must not be confounded with the tribute paid to the Temple.” —F. H. Madden: Jewish Coinage, chap. xi. p. 247.

Denarius Dei
[God's penny]. An earnest of a bargain, which was given to the church or poor. Denarii St. Petri [Peter's pence]. One penny from each family, given to the Pope.

Denarius tertius comitatus.
One-third of the pence of the county, which was paid to the earl. The other two-thirds belonged to the Crown. (See D.)

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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