Door

(Greek, thura; Anglo-Saxon, dora.)

The door must be either shut or open.
It must be one way or the other. This is from a French comedy called Le Grondeur, where the master scolds his servant for leaving the door open. The servant says that he was scolded the last time for shutting it, and adds: “Do you wish it shut?”—“No.”—“Do you wish it open?”—“No.”—“Why,” says the man, “it must be either shut or open.” He laid the charge at my door. He accused me of doing it. Next door to it. As, if not so, it was next door to it, i.e. very like it, next-door neighbour to it. Sin lieth at the door (Gen. iv. 7). The blame of sin lies at the door of the wrong-doer, and he must take the consequences.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

More on Door from Fact Monster:

  • The Doors - The Doors rock group Rock group remembered for its dark, poetic lyrics, psychedelic guitars, and ...
  • trap-door spider - trap-door spider trap-door spider, spiderof the same family as the native American tarantula. ...
  • Open Door - Open Door Open Door, maintenance in a certain territory of equal commercial and industrial rights ...
  • Open Door: Bibliography - Bibliography See G. Z. Wood, The Genesis of the Open Door Policy in China (1921); M. J. Bau, The ...
  • Open Door: Development of the Policy - Development of the Policy In the 1890s, the United States had become an East Asian power through ...

Related Content