Earing

Ploughing. (Anglo-Saxon, erian, to plough; Latin, aro.)

“And yet there are five years, in the which there shall neither be earing nor harvest.”—Genesis xiv. 6.

“In earing time and in harvest thou shalt rest.”—Exodus xxxiv. 21.

Earl (Anglo-Saxon, eorl, a man of position, in opposition to ceorl, a churl, or freeman of the lowest rank; Danish, jarl ). William the Conqueror tried to introduce the word Count, but did not succeed, although the wife of an earl is still called a countess.

“The sheriff is called in Latin vice-comés, as being the deputy of the earl or comés, to whom the custody of the shire is said to have been committed.” —Blackstone: Commentaries, book

i. chap. ix. p. 339.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

More on Earing from Fact Monster:

  • ear - ear ear, organ of hearing and equilibrium. The human ear consists of outer, middle, and inner ...
  • EAR - The ear is the organ of hearing and balance. The outer ear collects sound and directs it to the sensory structures deep inside the skull.
  • War of Jenkins's Ear - Jenkins's Ear, War of Jenkins's Ear, War of, 1739–41, struggle between England and ...
  • Where does ear wax come from? - Where does ear wax come from? Ear wax is made by skin glands near our ear drums. The wax protects ...
  • ear: Disorders of the Ear - Disorders of the Ear One of the most common ear diseases is known as otitis media, a middle ear ...

Related Content