Injunction

A writ forbidding a person to encroach on another's privileges; as, to sell a book which is only a colourable copy of another author's book; or to violate a patent; or to perform a play based on a novel without permission of the novelist; or to publish a book the rights of which are reserved. Injunctions are of two sorts—temporary and perpetual. The first is limited “till the coming on of the defendant's answer”; the latter is based on the merits of the case, and is of perpetual force.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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