Societe de Momus

One of the minor clubs of Paris for the reunion of song-writers and singers. The most noted of these clubs was the Caveau, or in full Les Diners du Careau, founded in 1733 by Piron, Crébillon, jun., and Collet. This club lasted till the Revolution. In the Consulate was formed Les Dîners du Vaudeville, for the habitués of the drama; these dîners were held in the house of Julliet, an actor. In 1806 the old Caveau was revived under the name of the Caveau Moderne, and the muster was once a month at a restaurant entitled La Rocher de Cancale, famous for fish dinners, and Laujon (the French Anacreon) was president. Béranger belonged to this club, which lasted ten years. In 1824 was founded the Gymnase Lyrique, which, like the Caveau, published an annual volume of songs; this society was dissolved in 1841. In 1834 was founded La Lice Chansonniére, for those who could not afford to join the Caveau or the Gymnase, to which we owe some of the best French songs.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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