Stomach

Appetite: “He who hath no stomach for this fight.” (Shakespeare Henry V., iv. 3.) Appetite for honours, etc., or ambition:

“Wolsey was a man of an unbounded stomach.” (Henry VIII., iv. 2.)

Appetite or inclination: “Let me praise you while I have the stomach.” (Merchant of Venice, iii. 5.)

Stomach.
To swallow, to accept with appetite, to digest. To stomach an insult. To swallow it and not resent it.

“If you must believe, stomach not all.” —Shakespeare: Antony and Cleopatra, iii. 4.

Stomach,
meaning “wrath,” end the verb “to be angry,” is the Latin stomachus, stomachari.

“Peli'dæ stomachum cedere nescii.” Herace. (“The stomach [wrath] of relentless Achilics.”)

“Stomachabatur si quid asperius dixerim.”' —Cicero. (“His stomach rose if I spoke sharper than usual.”)

The fourth stomach of ruminatirg animals
is called the abomasus or abomasum (from ab-omasum).

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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