Tuck

A long narrow sword. (Gaelic, tuca ,] Welsh twca, Italian stocco, German stock, French estoc.) In Hamlet the word is erroneously printed “stuck,” in Malone's edition.

If he by chance escape your venomous tue
Our purpose may hold there.

Act iv. 9

A good tuck in
or tuck out. A good feed. To tuck is to full, a tucker is a fuller. Hence, to cram. The fold of a dress to allow for growth is called a tuck, and a little frill on the top thereof is called a tucker. (Anglo-Saxon, tuc-ian.

I'll tuck him up.
Stab him, do for him. Tuck is a small dirk used by artillerymen. (See above.)

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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