Tyburn

is Twa-burne, the “two rivulets;” so called because two small rivers met in this locality.

Tyburn's triple tree.
A gallows, which consists of two uprights and a beam resting on them. Previous to 1783 Tyburn was the chief place of execution in London, and a gallows was permanently erected there. In the reign of Henry VIII. the average number of persons executed annually in England was 2,000. The present number is under twelve.

Kings of Tyburn.
Public executioners. (See Hangmen.)

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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