York

when it was Saxon, was called Eorwic, and the legend is that a Duko of Effroc being drowned at the foot of the wall caused this name to be given to the city. Southwark Wall was also called the Effroc Wall or Stone. (Victor Hugo: L'Homme qui Rit, pt. ii. bk. iii. l.)

York
is Eure-wic (pron. Yorric), and means the town on the Eure, now called the Ouse. The Romans Latinised the word Eure or Evre into “Evora” or “Ebora,” and wic into “vicum;” whence Ebora-vicum, contracted into Eboracum.

Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
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