black humor

black humor, in literature, drama, and film, grotesque or morbid humor used to express the absurdity, insensitivity, paradox, and cruelty of the modern world. Ordinary characters or situations are usually exaggerated far beyond the limits of normal satire or irony. Black humor uses devices often associated with tragedy and is sometimes equated with tragic farce. For example, Stanley Kubrick's film Dr. Strangelove; or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1963) is a terrifying comic treatment of the circumstances surrounding the dropping of an atom bomb, while Jules Feiffer's comedy Little Murders (1965) is a delineation of the horrors of modern urban life, focusing particularly on random assassinations. The novels of such writers as Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Joseph Heller, and Philip Roth contain elements of black humor.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

More on black humor from Fact Monster:

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  • Thomas Pynchon - Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon, Thomas , 1937–, American novelist, b. Glen Cove, N.Y., grad. Cornell ...
  • T. C. Boyle - Boyle, T. C. Boyle, T. C. (Thomas John Coraghessan Boyle), 1948–, American writer, b. ...
  • Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. - Biography of Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., The author of Slaughterhouse-Five

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