George Frederick Bodley

Bodley, George Frederick (bŏdˈlē) [key], 1827–1907, English architect. One of the most prominent and prolific ecclesiastical architects, Bodley was a pupil of Sir George Gilbert Scott. A friend of William Morris and the other Pre-Raphaelites, he also did much to foster good taste in the applied arts. Among his many works is Queens' College Chapel at Cambridge. His secular buildings include additions to Magdalen and other colleges at Oxford. Besides his English work, he designed cathedrals in Tasmania, in San Francisco, and, with his pupil James Vaughan, the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul in Washington, D.C.

See B. F. L. Clarke, Church Builders of the Nineteenth Century (1938).

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  • Washington National Cathedral - Image of Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. designed by George Frederick Bodley and Henry Vaughan in 1990.

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