Bonaparte

Napoleon's Siblings

Joseph Bonaparte

Joseph, 1768–1844, was the eldest of the children of Carlo and Letizia to survive infancy. Having gained some note as French minister to Parma and Rome, he became (1797) a member of the Council of Five Hundred for Corsica. Joseph later negotiated a treaty (1800) with the United States and represented France in the peace negotiations at Lunéville (1801) and Amiens (1802).

When Napoleon became emperor, Joseph bitterly protested being left out of the line of succession. In 1806 Napoleon made him king of Naples, which Joseph administered very inefficiently, and in 1808 he was made king of Spain instead. Thoroughly unsuccessful in defending his throne during the Peninsular War, he reluctantly abdicated in 1813. From 1815 to 1841 he lived mainly in the United States—at Bordentown, N.J. He died in Italy. Napoleon I was born a year after Joseph, in 1769.

Lucien Bonaparte

Napoleon's brother Lucien, 1775–1840, first became prominent as president of the Council of Five Hundred. He took an important part in the coup of 18 Brumaire (1799); by boldly haranguing the troops while the council was about to outlaw Napoleon, who had lost his nerve, Lucien succeeded in dispersing the Five Hundred. The Directory was overthrown, and Napoleon became First Consul. However, Lucien was critical of his brother's policies and married a commoner against Napoleon's wishes.

Lucien went to live in Italy under the protection of Pope Pius VII, who made him prince of Canino. When Napoleon made the pope a prisoner, Lucien attempted to flee (1810) to the United States but was captured at sea by the British and interned in England. He returned to Italy in 1814 and became reconciled with Napoleon, who was then in Elba. Lucien returned to France during the Hundred Days, and after Waterloo he tried to secure the throne for Napoleon II. He died in exile in Italy.

Elisa Bonaparte

Napoleon's sister Elisa, 1777–1820, married Felix Pasquale Bacciochi, an insignificant captain of infantry. Napoleon made her princess of Piombino and Lucca (1805) and grand duchess of Tuscany (1809). Elisa was a competent administrator and was admired for her intelligence. After Waterloo she lived in retirement.

Louis Bonaparte

Napoleon's brother Louis, 1778–1846, was king of Holland (1806–10). He reluctantly married (1802) Hortense de Beauharnais. Napoleon forced him to abdicate because Louis, more concerned for the interests of the Dutch people than for those of France, defied the ruinous Continental System. He died in Italy.

Pauline Bonaparte

Pauline, 1780–1825, was Napoleon's favorite sister. A woman of great beauty and a notoriously promiscuous seductress, she was the subject of considerable scandal. She accompanied her husband, General Leclerc, on the expedition to Haiti. After Leclerc's death Napoleon arranged her marriage (1803) to Camillo Borghese, a member of the Roman nobility, but they soon separated. Pauline, made princess of Guastalla in 1806, fell into temporary disfavor with her brother because of her hostility to Empress Marie Louise, but when Napoleon's fortune failed, Pauline, the only sibling to join him in exile on Elba, showed herself more loyal than any of his other sisters and brothers.

Caroline Bonaparte

Another sister, Caroline, 1782–1839, went to France with the family in 1793 and married (1800) General Murat. Her ambition, joined with that of her husband, made her grand duchess of Cleves and Berg and later (1808–15) queen of Naples. There she did much to stimulate arts and letters and encouraged the recovery of the classical treasures of Pompeii and Naples. Her restless ambition was still unsatisfied; the birth of Napoleon's son destroyed her hope of succession for her own son. She and Murat entered upon intrigues with Napoleon's enemies, but with no positive result. After the fall of Napoleon, Clemens von Metternich tried to save Murat's throne. Murat's rashness, however, led to his execution, and Caroline fled to Austria.

Jérôme Bonaparte

Napoleon's youngest brother, Jérôme, 1784–1860, served in the navy and was sent to the West Indies. On a visit to the United States he met Elizabeth Patterson, whom he married in 1803, although, as a minor, he lacked the necessary consent. Napoleon refused to recognize the marriage and had little difficulty in changing the mind of the flighty Jérôme, for whom he made (1807) a new match with Catherine of Württemberg.

Jérôme became king of Westphalia (1807–13), fought in the Russian campaign, and led a division at Waterloo. He was more remarkable for his extravagant irresponsibility than for administrative or military skill. Leaving France after Waterloo, he returned in 1847 and later received honors at the court of his nephew, Napoleon III. There he was known as Prince Jérôme.

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