Booth

Booth, family prominent in the Salvation Army, founded by William Booth. His wife, Catherine Mumford Booth, 1829–90, whom he married in 1855, played a leading part in the foundation and development of the Salvation Army, devoting herself particularly to its work among women and children. Their eldest son, Bramwell Booth, 1856–1929, succeeded his father in 1912 as general of the Salvation Army. Another son, Ballington Booth, 1859–1940, was commander (1885–87) of the Army in Australia and then commander (1887–96) in the United States, where his wife, Maud Charlesworth Ballington Booth, 1865–1948, shared his labors; in 1896 they withdrew from the Salvation Army and founded the Volunteers of America. A daughter of William Booth, Emma Moss Booth-Tucker, 1860–1903, was in charge (1880–88) of the international training homes of the Salvation Army. She and her husband, Frederick St. George de Latour Booth-Tucker, 1853–1929, who had resigned from the India civil service to join the Salvation Army, jointly commanded the Army in the United States from 1896 until her death in 1903. See also Booth, Evangeline Cory.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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