Karl Ferdinand Braun

Braun, Karl Ferdinand (fĕrˈdēnäntˌ broun) [key], 1850–1918, German physicist. Braun taught at the Univ. of Marburg, Strasbourg Univ., Karlsruhe's Technische Hochschule, and the Univ. of Tübingen before being named director of Physics institute at Strasbourg in 1895. He conducted researches in electricity (an electrometer and a cathode-ray tube bear his name) and the transmission of signals by radio waves (wireless telegraphy). For his pioneering work on wireless telegraphy he shared with Marconi the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics.

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