Percy Williams Bridgman

Bridgman, Percy Williams, 1882–1961, American physicist, b. Cambridge, Mass., grad. Harvard (B.A., 1904; Ph.D., 1908). From 1910 he taught at Harvard, as professor from 1919. He won the 1946 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the physics of high pressures. He is known also for his studies of electrical conduction in metals and properties of crystals and for his writings on the philosophy of modern science. His works include The Logic of Modern Physics (1927), The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), and Nature of Thermodynamics (1941).

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