Ludwig Uhland

Uhland, Ludwig (lŏtˈvĭkh ōˈlänt) [key], 1787–1862, German poet, leader of the Swabian group. He studied and practiced law at Tübingen, held various official posts, and taught German literature. His lyrics and ballads, almost all written in his youth, made him one of the most popular German poets of the romantic period. Noted for their lucid, polished style, they include "The Minstrel's Curse,""The Good Comrade," and "Taillefer." His other works include Gedichte [poems] (1815), Vaterländische Gedichte [songs of the fatherland] (1816), and the unsuccessful drama Ludwig der Bayer (1819), which, however, contains some of his best verse.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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