Merino sheep

Merino sheep (mərēˈnō) [key], breed intermediate in body size having fine wool, developed in Spain. These sheep are noted for their hardiness and their herding instincts and have been used as parents of several other breeds, notably the Rambouillet of France. Three strains have been developed. Types A and B are strongly and moderately wrinkled, respectively; the C, or Delaine, type is much smoother, and has better combinations of wool and meat qualities. Merinos are white-faced with the rams horned and the ewes hornless.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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