nucleotide

nucleotide (nōˈklēətĪdˌ, nyōˈ–) [key], organic substance that serves as a monomer in forming nucleic acids. Nucleotides consist of either a purine or a pyrimidine base, a ribose or deoxyribose, and a phosphate group. Adenosine triphosphate serves as the principle energy carrier for the cell's reactions. The most important nucleotides are those derived from the bases adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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