primogeniture

primogeniture, in law, the rule of inheritance whereby land descends to the oldest son. Under the feudal system of medieval Europe, primogeniture generally governed the inheritance of land held in military tenure (see feudalism; knight). The effect of this rule was to keep the father's land for the support of the son who rendered the required military service. When feudalism declined and the payment of a tax was substituted for military service, the need for primogeniture disappeared. In England, consequently, there was enacted the Statute of Wills (1540), which permitted the oldest son to be entirely cut off from inheriting, and in the 17th cent. military tenure was abolished; primogeniture is, nevertheless, still customary in England. In the United States primogeniture never became widely established. For other traditional types of inheritance, see gavelkind; borough-English.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

More on primogeniture from Fact Monster:

  • borough-English - borough-English borough-English, a custom of inheritance in parts of England whereby land passed ...
  • Albert Achilles - Albert Achilles Albert Achilles , 1414–86, elector of Brandenburg (1470–86); third son ...
  • gavelkind - gavelkind gavelkind [M.E.,=family tenure], custom of inheritance of lands held in socage tenure, ...
  • James Harrington - Harrington, James Harrington, James, 1611–77, English political writer. His Commonwealth of ...
  • Thomas Jefferson: Revolutionary Leader - Revolutionary Leader In the colonial house of burgesses Jefferson was (1769–75) a leader of ...

See more Encyclopedia articles on: Legal Terms and Concepts