History of Snowboarding

The history of snowboarding is much easier to trace than that of skiing. Sherman Poppen is generally considered to be the inventor of the snowboard. In 1965, he fastened two skis together so his daughter could “surf” down a snow-covered slope near their Michigan home. He called the sport “snurfing,” a combination of snow and surfing. Snowboarding didn’t reach a fever pitch until the mid 1980s. Early snowboarders, mostly male teenagers, were often viewed as rebels and risk-takers. Now, males and females of all ages are seen cruising down the slopes on snowboards.

Snowboarding debuted as an Olympic sport in 1998. Men and women compete in halfpipe and the giant slalom events. The halfpipe is a U-shaped course carved into a mountain. Competitors are scored for their technique. In the parallel giant slalom, snowboarders race against each other on separate slalom courses.


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