Fashion Timeline: Modern Fashion
Part II: 1930-1968
by David Johnson

1930 1940-1945 1947 1950 1954 1960s 1968 Next: 1970-1990
1930
Hemlines drop; then gradually rise



Alix "Madame" Grès becomes famous for elegant draped dresses


Tennis star Rene Lacoste, known as "le Crocodile," manufactures a versatile new tennis shirt. It features an embroidered crocodile, believed to be the first instance of a designer logo to appear on a garment.
1940-1945
World War II forces many Paris couture houses to close
1947
Christian Dior reestablishes Paris as fashion center; revives haute couture; replaces wartime austerity with the glamour of the "New Look" with tight waist, stiff petticoats, billowing skirts
1950
Shoes have pointed toes, stiletto heels
1954
Cristóbal Balenciaga introduces "semi-fit" dresses with soft, round shoulders; is the classic designer of the 1950s
1960s
Early 1960s
Pierre Cardin becomes first designer to license his name for various products; is first to create ready-to-wear lines



London boutique owner Mary Quant champions the youth movement; introduces mini-skirt, hot pants; launches Twiggy as supermodel; becomes 1960s most influential 1960s designer


1962
Yves St. Laurent opens fashion house; often uses ethnic inspirations; remains most classic modern designer, heir to Chanel, Balenciaga


Mid 1960s
Influenced by rock music, "Mod" scene makes London major fashion center with fun, revolutionary clothes: bell bottoms, psychedelic prints, wild colors, dresses made of vinyl, paper, cellophane, metal, covered in mirrors; go-go boots; ruffled shirts for men; Nehru jackets; fur vests



Rudi Gernreich creates "radical" fashion - topless swimsuit, see-through blouse, "no bra" look
1968
Calvin Klein begins producing elegant, simple clothes, favoring neural earth tones and luxurious fabrics



Ralph Lauren creates men's wear line; expands into women's wear; favors natural fabrics; designs feature western or country motifs
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Next: Part III—1970-1990
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