Part Fifth

It was no easy matter to convince
Heinrich that it was finished.  Hard to say
That though they could not meet (he saw her wince)
She still must keep the locket to allay
Suspicion in her husband.  She would pay
Him from her savings bit by bit — the oath
He swore at that was startling to them both.
Her resolution taken, Frau Altgelt
Adhered to it, and suffered no regret.
She found her husband all that she had felt
His music to contain.  Her days were set
In his as though she were an amulet
Cased in bright gold.  She joyed in her confining;
Her eyes put out her looking-glass with shining.
Charlotta was so gay that old, dull tasks
Were furbished up to seem like rituals.
She baked and brewed as one who only asks
The right to serve.  Her daily manuals
Of prayer were duties, and her festivals
When Theodore praised some dish, or frankly said
She had a knack in making up a bed.
So Autumn went, and all the mountains round
The city glittered white with fallen snow,
For it was Winter.  Over the hard ground
Herr Altgelt's footsteps came, each one a blow.
On the swept flags behind the currant row
Charlotta stood to greet him.  But his lip
Only flicked hers.  His Concert-Meistership
Was first again.  This evening he had got
Important news.  The opera ordered from
Young Mozart was arrived.  That old despot,
The Bishop of Salzburg, had let him come
Himself to lead it, and the parts, still hot
From copying, had been tried over.  Never
Had any music started such a fever.
The orchestra had cheered till they were hoarse,
The singers clapped and clapped.  The town was made,
With such a great attraction through the course
Of Carnival time.  In what utter shade
All other cities would be left!  The trade
In music would all drift here naturally.
In his excitement he forgot his tea.
Lotta was forced to take his cup and put
It in his hand.  But still he rattled on,
Sipping at intervals.  The new catgut
Strings he was using gave out such a tone
The "Maestro" had remarked it, and had gone
Out of his way to praise him.  Lotta smiled,
He was as happy as a little child.
From that day on, Herr Altgelt, more and more,
Absorbed himself in work.  Lotta at first
Was patient and well-wishing.  But it wore
Upon her when two weeks had brought no burst
Of loving from him.  Then she feared the worst;
That his short interest in her was a light
Flared up an instant only in the night.
`Idomeneo' was the opera's name,
A name that poor Charlotta learnt to hate.
Herr Altgelt worked so hard he seldom came
Home for his tea, and it was very late,
Past midnight sometimes, when he knocked.  His state
Was like a flabby orange whose crushed skin
Is thin with pulling, and all dented in.
He practised every morning and her heart
Followed his bow.  But often she would sit,
While he was playing, quite withdrawn apart,
Absently fingering and touching it,
The locket, which now seemed to her a bit
Of some gone youth.  His music drew her tears,
And through the notes he played, her dreading ears
Heard Heinrich's voice, saying he had not changed;
Beer merchants had no ecstasies to take
Their minds off love.  So far her thoughts had ranged
Away from her stern vow, she chanced to take
Her way, one morning, quite by a mistake,
Along the street where Heinrich had his shop.
What harm to pass it since she should not stop!
It matters nothing how one day she met
Him on a bridge, and blushed, and hurried by.
Nor how the following week he stood to let
Her pass, the pavement narrowing suddenly.
How once he took her basket, and once he
Pulled back a rearing horse who might have struck
Her with his hoofs.  It seemed the oddest luck
How many times their business took them each
Right to the other.  Then at last he spoke,
But she would only nod, he got no speech
From her.  Next time he treated it in joke,
And that so lightly that her vow she broke
And answered.  So they drifted into seeing
Each other as before.  There was no fleeing.
Christmas was over and the Carnival
Was very near, and tripping from each tongue
Was talk of the new opera.  Each book-stall
Flaunted it out in bills, what airs were sung,
What singers hired.  Pictures of the young
"Maestro" were for sale.  The town was mad.
Only Charlotta felt depressed and sad.
Each day now brought a struggle 'twixt her will
And Heinrich's.  'Twixt her love for Theodore
And him.  Sometimes she wished to kill
Herself to solve her problem.  For a score
Of reasons Heinrich tempted her.  He bore
Her moods with patience, and so surely urged
Himself upon her, she was slowly merged
Into his way of thinking, and to fly
With him seemed easy.  But next morning would
The Stradivarius undo her mood.
Then she would realize that she must cleave
Always to Theodore.  And she would try
To convince Heinrich she should never leave,
And afterwards she would go home and grieve.
All thought in Munich centered on the part
Of January when there would be given
`Idomeneo' by Wolfgang Mozart.
The twenty-ninth was fixed.  And all seats, even
Those almost at the ceiling, which were driven
Behind the highest gallery, were sold.
The inches of the theatre went for gold.
Herr Altgelt was a shadow worn so thin
With work, he hardly printed black behind
The candle.  He and his old violin
Made up one person.  He was not unkind,
But dazed outside his playing, and the rind,
The pine and maple of his fiddle, guarded
A part of him which he had quite discarded.
   It woke in the silence of frost-bright nights,
   In little lights,
   Like will-o'-the-wisps flickering, fluttering,
   Here — there —
   Spurting, sputtering,
   Fading and lighting,
   Together, asunder —
   Till Lotta sat up in bed with wonder,
   And the faint grey patch of the window shone
   Upon her sitting there, alone.
   For Theodore slept.
The twenty-eighth was last rehearsal day,
'Twas called for noon, so early morning meant
Herr Altgelt's only time in which to play
His part alone.  Drawn like a monk who's spent
Himself in prayer and fasting, Theodore went
Into the kitchen, with a weary word
Of cheer to Lotta, careless if she heard.
   Lotta heard more than his spoken word.
   She heard the vibrating of strings and wood.
   She was washing the dishes, her hands all suds,
   When the sound began,
   Long as the span
   Of a white road snaking about a hill.
   The orchards are filled
   With cherry blossoms at butterfly poise.
   Hawthorn buds are cracking,
   And in the distance a shepherd is clacking
   His shears, snip-snipping the wool from his sheep.
   The notes are asleep,
   Lying adrift on the air
   In level lines
   Like sunlight hanging in pines and pines,
   Strung and threaded,
   All imbedded
   In the blue-green of the hazy pines.
   Lines — long, straight lines!
   And stems,
   Long, straight stems
   Pushing up
   To the cup of blue, blue sky.
   Stems growing misty
   With the many of them,
   Red-green mist
   Of the trees,
   And these
   Wood-flavoured notes.
   The back is maple and the belly is pine.
   The rich notes twine
   As though weaving in and out of leaves,
   Broad leaves
   Flapping slowly like elephants' ears,
   Waving and falling.
   Another sound peers
   Through little pine fingers,
   And lingers, peeping.
   Ping!  Ping!  pizzicato, something is cheeping.
   There is a twittering up in the branches,
   A chirp and a lilt,
   And crimson atilt on a swaying twig.
   Wings!  Wings!
   And a little ruffled-out throat which sings.
   The forest bends, tumultuous
   With song.
   The woodpecker knocks,
   And the song-sparrow trills,
   Every fir, and cedar, and yew
   Has a nest or a bird,
   It is quite absurd
   To hear them cutting across each other:
   Peewits, and thrushes, and larks, all at once,
   And a loud cuckoo is trying to smother
   A wood-pigeon perched on a birch,
   "Roo — coo — oo — oo —"
   "Cuckoo!  Cuckoo!  That's one for you!"
   A blackbird whistles, how sharp, how shrill!
   And the great trees toss
   And leaves blow down,
   You can almost hear them splash on the ground.
   The whistle again:
   It is double and loud!
   The leaves are splashing,
   And water is dashing
   Over those creepers, for they are shrouds;
   And men are running up them to furl the sails,
   For there is a capful of wind to-day,
   And we are already well under way.
   The deck is aslant in the bubbling breeze.
   "Theodore, please.
   Oh, Dear, how you tease!"
   And the boatswain's whistle sounds again,
   And the men pull on the sheets:
       "My name is Hanging Johnny,
          Away-i-oh;
       They call me Hanging Johnny,
          So hang, boys, hang."
   The trees of the forest are masts, tall masts;
   They are swinging over
   Her and her lover.
   Almost swooning
   Under the ballooning canvas,
   She lies
   Looking up in his eyes
   As he bends farther over.
   Theodore, still her lover!
The suds were dried upon Charlotta's hands,
She leant against the table for support,
Wholly forgotten.  Theodore's eyes were brands
Burning upon his music.  He stopped short.
Charlotta almost heard the sound of bands
Snapping.  She put one hand up to her heart,
Her fingers touched the locket with a start.
Herr Altgelt put his violin away
Listlessly.  "Lotta, I must have some rest.
The strain will be a hideous one to-day.
Don't speak to me at all.  It will be best
If I am quiet till I go."  And lest
She disobey, he left her.  On the stairs
She heard his mounting steps.  What use were prayers!
He could not hear, he was not there, for she
Was married to a mummy, a machine.
Her hand closed on the locket bitterly.
Before her, on a chair, lay the shagreen
Case of his violin.  She saw the clean
Sun flash the open clasp.  The locket's edge
Cut at her fingers like a pushing wedge.
A heavy cart went by, a distant bell
Chimed ten, the fire flickered in the grate.
She was alone.  Her throat began to swell
With sobs.  What kept her here, why should she wait?
The violin she had begun to hate
Lay in its case before her.  Here she flung
The cover open.  With the fiddle swung
Over her head, the hanging clock's loud ticking
Caught on her ear.  'Twas slow, and as she paused
The little door in it came open, flicking
A wooden cuckoo out:  "Cuckoo!"  It caused
The forest dream to come again.  "Cuckoo!"
Smashed on the grate, the violin broke in two.
"Cuckoo!  Cuckoo!" the clock kept striking on;
But no one listened.  Frau Altgelt had gone.