Respighi, Ottorino

Respighi, Ottorino ôttōrē´nō rāspē´gē [key], 1879–1936, Italian composer, studied with Rimsky-Korsakov and Max Bruch. He was director (1924–25) of the Conservatory of St. Cecilia, Rome, afterward teaching advanced composition there until his death. Among his romantic symphonic poems are The Fountains of Rome (1917), The Pines of Rome (1924), and Roman Festivals (1929), which evoke Italian scenes and show him a master of orchestration. He wrote other orchestral works, chamber music, piano pieces, and operas, including Belfagor (1923 a comic opera), The Sunken Bell (1927 based on Hauptmann's Die versunkene Glocke ), The Flame (1934), and the posthumously produced Lucrezia (1937), which was finished by his wife, Elsa.

See biography by E. Respighi (tr. 1962).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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