chloropicrin

chloropicrin klōr˝əpĭk´rĭn [key], colorless oily liquid used as a poison gas . It is a powerful irritant, causing lachrymation, vomiting, bronchitis, and pulmonary edema lung injury from chloropicrin may result in death. Trace amounts in the air cause a burning sensation in the eyes, which serves as a warning of exposure. Chloropicrin is more toxic than chlorine but less toxic than phosgene . It is relatively inert and does not react with the chemicals commonly used in gas masks. It has been extensively used as a vomiting gas by the military. It is also used industrially in small amounts as a warning agent in commercial fumigants and as an insecticide and disinfectant for grain. Chloropicrin has the formula CCl 3NO 2. It boils at 112°C with partial decomposition to phosgene and nitrosyl chloride.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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