DEET

DEET or N,N-diethyl- meta -toluamide, C 12H 17ON, nearly odorless, colorless to clear yellow oily liquid that boils at 111°C. DEET was developed by the U.S. Army in 1946 for use as an insect repellent and is now a common ingredient in many commercial insect repellents. Extensive testing has shown that products containing DEET provide the best protection against mosquito bites and black-legged, or deer, ticks. It is also known as diethyltoluamide.

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